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12 Questions to Ask After an Interview

Questions to ask after a Job interview

We’ve compiled a list of good questions to ask after an interview to help you make a lasting impression. Stand out among other candidates. Read more here.

Job interviews can be daunting. But it’s easier to get through them if you know what to expect. An interview is a two-way street. Your potential employer wants you to engage with them during the interview. They want to gauge your interest in the industry, the company, and the role. Besides, no one wants to have a conversation with themselves!

Asking questions at the end of your job interview lets you have a two-way discussion about the role. It’s also the best way to clarify any doubts. We’ve compiled a list of good questions to ask after an interview to help you make a lasting impression and stand out from other candidates.

12 Best Questions to Ask After an Interview

1. How did this position become available?

Asking how the role became available helps you understand how the company has developed recently, without being intrusive. Someone may have changed roles, been promoted, or the team may be expanding. It’ll give your interviewer the opportunity to elaborate on the structure of the team and any recent changes in the department.

2. How has the company, and this position, evolved over time?

Following on from the last question, this one will give the interviewer the chance to expand on the evolution of the company and team structure, since they started working there. This should give you a good idea of how the company has grown and the direction it’s going in.

3. What are some of the day-to-day responsibilities of the role?

This question shows that you’re a practical person who’s eager to get stuck in. Plus, it will help you decide whether the job’s the right fit for you. A job may sound suitable on paper but may not be what you’re looking for.

4. Can you tell me more about the team members I will be working with daily?

Asking this question will help you understand how large your team is and the types of people you’ll be working with every day. It shows that you want to understand your role within the company and that you’re keen to work as part of a team.

5. Can you tell me more about the company culture?

A good company culture is key to happy employees. It should be a high priority during your job hunt. Asking about company culture will give you a better idea of the company’s working environment. It’ll show how much your company values its employees and if they offer any employee benefits or support programmes. Nowadays, with such an emphasis on company culture, employers are expecting this question more often.

6. Does your company offer any support for personal and professional development for employees?

This is like the previous question. It will help you assess the support the company offers employees, and whether this is suitable for you. On the flipside, it’ll also show employers that you are determined to better yourself and succeed in the industry - a valuable quality to have!

7. How does your company measure success for this position?

This question shows that you’re a goal-oriented individual. You want to add value to the company and progress in your career. It also indicates what your employers expect from you and what you need to achieve to excel at your job. You could even ask your interviewer to describe the ‘perfect employee’ and assess your strengths in line with this ideal.

8. What are some of the key challenges of this role?

Asking about the challenges of the role shows that you’re actively thinking about managing your new responsibilities. This question would lead nicely into a discussion about your problem-solving skills. It gives you the chance to mention a previous situation where you dealt with a problem or faced a challenge head-on. It could also be a great opportunity to show how you can help the company address any pain points.

9. How do you see the company developing in future and how will your role contribute to this?

This question lets employers know that you see yourself within the company’s long-term plan. It shows you’re keen to help them grow, and you’re not just focused on personal gain.

10. Do you have any feedback about my current skill set or is there anything I need to address before starting my role?

Asking for direct feedback like this, shows that you’re open to constructive criticism. It means you’re keen to improve your skills and develop your knowledge. This is a highly desirable quality employers look for when hiring! Once you get feedback, you can plan to fill any knowledge or skills gaps before you start.

11. What's your favourite thing about working here?

Listening to how someone else speaks about their company and their job can be a real eye-opener. Look out for the language they use to describe their experiences. This can help you decide if it’s the right place for you. Additionally, it gives your interviewer a chance to talk a little bit about themselves. It shows you care about what they have to say.

12. Earlier, you spoke about X, could you provide more information on this?

Finally, it’s always a good idea to reflect on something your interviewer said earlier in the interview. It shows that you’ve been listening during the conversation. It can also help you learn more about specific areas you are interested in. Say the interviewer touched upon a certain technology you’re passionate about or a skill you have special training in, this question can help you show this off.

Tips for forming questions to ask after an interview

  • Always relate your questions back to the company or the role you’re applying for. It’s important to keep your questions focused on your job and show your professionalism.
  • Keep your questions concise. Complex questions may be overwhelming for interviewers, and may be better answered when broken down into smaller questions.
  • Keep your questions varied. Show your employers that you’re interested in a broad range of subjects and all aspects of the job by asking a variety of questions.

So, is it bad not to ask questions after an interview? We can’t speak on behalf of all interviews, however, in most cases, it’s recommended that you ask at least a couple of questions to get as much information out of your interviewer as possible and show them more about who you are. For more interview preparation resources, check out our guide to strength-based interviews, how to ace a video interview  and the FDM interview process and questions.

About Preeta Ghoshal

Preeta is a content writer with over 10 years’ experience across print, digital and broadcast media. She has worked extensively in multi-media content creation. Her work reflects a mix of subject matter research and storytelling to produce content that is both informative and easily digestible. She is presently providing content support to each of the FDM programmes and the wider marketing team.


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